Life,  Marketing,  Writing

Basic Marketing Tips for Authors (No. 4)

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Today’s going to be all about Goodreads. Goodreads came on the scene in 2006 and is defined by Wikipedia as a “social cataloging” website that allows individuals to freely search its database of books, annotations, and reviews. Users can sign up and register books to generate library catalogs and reading lists. Goodreads was intended to be superior to Amazon as far as ratings and reviews go, but alas, Amazon bought them in 2013.

The good news is that Goodreads is free. You can set up an account, make friends, link to your other social media and website and, if you’re an author, create an author “dashboard” so readers can connect with you in that way. You can link your blog directly on the site, ask and answer questions, host give-aways, all the Things.

Y’all, I’ve quit Goodreads three times, so I have a really difficult time getting down with this one. I have finally settled into the idea that I have to have Goodreads but that’s about it. I will respond to messages and whatnot, and every now and then I will list a book I’m reading and give it a star rating. I have given full reviews in the past, but I’m not doing that at this time. I no longer link my social media to it, mostly because not all my connections need to know I read ten pages of Whatever I Read (it got annoying).

So, here’s my pitch. As an author, sign up for Goodreads and set up your author dashboard. Claim your titles. Do this because if you don’t, somebody else might and you will have lost control of your image, your titles, etc. While that doesn’t happen often, the mere thought of it makes me nauseous. At the very minimum, do that, and make sure you link to your website and use the same headshot or logo you use for everything else. When your new book comes out, go to the platform and claim it. If you want to do more, go for it. I’m not a fan.

Here’s why. When I first joined in 2006, Goodreads was exactly what the founders wanted it to be: a way to keep track of your readings, make connections with others you either know, wanted to know, or with whom you have similar tastes, and find new authors to love. What it became, however, is something completely different, with no recourse for the author. You’ve heard horror stories about authors getting bashed on Amazon, and it happens on Goodreads, too. It basically makes everyone and their dog a book reviewer and not everyone takes that responsibility seriously. They think they do, but they don’t. The bottom line for an author is that you have no recourse, other than arguing on the platform, with a reader, to correct something that’s just not right. Meanwhile, it can wreck your star rating, which can affect your sales.

So, am I using Goodreads to it’s greatest potential as a free tool? No. I’m not sure that’s possible but I encourage you to do what you can insofar as it is under your control. All that being said, you can find me on Goodreads HERE.

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